Operating the 240V/30amp Brewing Power Controller

The 240V Brewing Power Controller (BPC) is designed to give safe and easy access for heating water with 240V/30amp power. Without it, one would either have to use 120V power to heat or plug a heating element directly into a 240V socket. Using 120V power (like is found in standard wall sockets) only delivers about 1500W power, and would take a very long time to heat water. On the other hand, plugging a 240V element directly into a 240V socket could cause electrical arcing which can damage the receptacle and even start a fire.

Using the Brewing Power Controller (BPC) to operate the heating element is safe and easy on the equipment. The 120V receptacle and switch (only on North American versions) on the top of the box allows power to your Water Heating Element to be controlled with the flip of a switch. The receptacle can also be used for a low amp accessory such as your Chugger Pump  (these 120V sockets are not recommend for use with 1500W heating elements as the power draw may blow the 15 amp fuse on the box; lower draw accessories such as the Chugger Pump, Electronic Temperature Controller, or Temperature Control Valve are recommended). 

Watch a video on the Brewing Power Controller at this link.

Operating your Brewing Power Controller (BPC) is easy when you follow these simple instructions.

 

14-30p on power box 

 

 

 

 

1. Turn both switches off, and plug the large BPC plug into a 'NEMA 14-30' receptacle on a 240V/30amp circuit. For most homes in North America, this is the same receptacle as is found behind an electric clothes drier. If you want to connect to a stove receptacle (NEMA 14-50) an adapter can be purchased here

 
Power Box connected to ETC

 

 

2. To control power to the element with an Electronic Temperature Controller (ETC), for example during mashing in order to control the temperature of your mash, or during fermentation to heat your wort/beer, connect the small 'contactor' cord at the back of the BPC to the heating socket (marked with an 'H' on the white controllers and a red flame on the black controllers) on the ETC, and plug the ETC into a wall receptacle or one of the sockets on the BPC. The small cord lets 240V power through to the element by opening and closing a 'contactor'. The ETC is very useful for controlling the temperature during mashing, but not as helpful to control your boil (see step 5 for that).

240V power box

 

 

3. If power will not be controlled with an ETC (e.g. during the boil), plug the smaller BPC 'contactor' cord directly into one of the receptacles on the BPC (or into a wall receptacle). This will close the contactor inside the BPC and allow power through to the element. If plugged into a receptacle on the BPC (for North American models), power to the element can be turned on and off by using the receptacle switch. (The power level can still be controlled manually; see point 5.) **When not using the element, the smaller contactor cord should be left unplugged.

 

L6-30 receptacle

 

 

 

 

4. Plug the heating element plug into the box. **It is recommended for additional safety that you have a GFCI on your breaker box, or install a spa GFI in between the breaker and the BPC.

Control power output to power box

 5. To manually control power to the 5500W heating element after plugging the small power cord directly into a socket, rotate the dial on the front of the box. (Pushing the dial in can also turn power on and off.) The dial is a digital controller that can precisely regulate the power to the element as a percentage of output; turn the dial to 100% and the element will produce full wattage; rotate it to 50% and the element will only effectively produce half wattage. This is especially useful during boil, when you may want to limit the boil during hot break, or if you want to control the amount of water you want to evaporate—a lot of water to evaporate and you want a high boil, only a little water and you want a low boil. It is also very useful for heating the fermenter during fermentation where the full 100% will scorch the yeast on the element. During fermentation it is recommended to set the power output to less than 3%.) 

 

 

 

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